VICTORIAN BURNLEY (Cont.)

Burnley from Springhill in 1854.

South Parade and Market Street (now Manchester Road ) lead into the centre of the town. Numerous mill chimneys indicate how important the cotton industry had become, but sheep still graze near the town centre. On the left can be seen the railway viaduct opened in 1848 when the railway reached Burnley. On the right are the railway goods yard and the roof of Thorneybank Station.

 
Burnley Improvement Acts 1846 & 1854.

By the 1840s Burnley was administered by a confusing number of committees and boards. These two Acts of Parliament placed the running of the town in the hands of Commissioners elected by the ratepayers. They were responsible for the amenities of the town and the supply of water and gas

 
Burnley Mechanics Institute, Manchester Road.

This was founded in 1834. The building on Manchester Road was opened in 1855 It soon became the centre of academic and social life in the town. It housed a subscribing library and technical and art schools.

 
Bank House Pit c. 1860.

By the 1850s coal mining was becoming important in Burnley. There were many small pits near the Centre and by the end of the century other, larger ones, had been sunk in the town.

 
Charter of Incorporation, 1861.

By 1861, Burnley’s population had reached over 28,000 and the town was granted the status of a Borough. The newly-elected Council met for the first time in January when John Moore was elected Mayor..

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