Early 19th Century.

The Rev. John Raws was assistant curate at St. Peter’s from c. 1887 to 1834, a period when most of the incumbents were absentees For much of the time he was also the headmaster of Burnley Grammar School. He lived on Bank Parade; Raws Street commemorates his name. He was a conscientious man, down to earth and well-liked by all. His memorial can be seen in the north aisle of the church.
 
Bar and Canal Aqueduct.

In 1801, the Leeds and Liverpool Canal was opened through Burnley and played a major part in the development of the town. This drawing shows the aqueduct in the embankment carrying the canal across the town. The “straight mile” is regarded as one of the wonders of the British canal network. In the foreground is the toll bar on Eastgate - now Yorkshire Street.

 
Improvement Act, 1819.

This set up the Police Circle, an area of ¾ mile radius from the merestone or marker outside the Bull Inn in St. James’s Street. The Act was not implemented and the administration of the town remained in the hands of a Town Committee elected by the Vestry Meeting set up in 1817.

 
St. Peter’s School.

In 1787, William Todd started a Sunday School in his home on Dawson Square opposite the church. This became associated with St. Peter’s. In 1828, a day school was opened, which still operates as the oldest elementary school in Burnley, A second school was opened in Pickup Croft in 1845 .

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